ROKOKO KOLO I

Serbian

 
PRONUNCIATION: roh-koh-KOH KOH-loh
 
TRANSLATION: Beautifully dressed girl
 
SOURCE: Dick Oakes learned this dance from John Filcich. Dick Crum and Atanas Kolarovski have taught variants.
 
BACKGROUND: Rokoko is a Croatian-Serbian dance with Hungarian influences. On their boots, the men wear spurs that jingle during the dance. Rokoko is danced by the Bunjevač (Catholic) people in the neighborhood of Subotice (Subotica), a city in the western part of Vojvodina in northern Serbia. Once, the largest city of Vojvodina region, contemporary Subotica is now the second largest city in the province, following Novi Sad. The name Subotica derives from the Serbian / Bunjevač word for "Saturday" or "Sabbath" ("subota") and first appeared in 1653.
 
MUSIC:Folk Dancer (45rpm) MH 1015-A
The Ethnic Connection: An Eclectic Collection (CD) 5: Rokoko kolo (Croatian & Serbian)
 
FORMATION:Closed or open cir of mixed M and W with little fingers linked with neighbors and held at shldr level in "W" pos. (Other versions have hands held low in "V" pos.)
 
METER/RHYTHM: 2/4
 
STEPS/STYLE: HOP: This is actually a low hop (or "lift") where the ball of the ft does not leave the floor.

Steps are small and crisp.


MEASMOVEMENT DESCRIPTION

 
 INTRODUCTION - None.
 
 THE DANCE
 
1Step R swd (ct 1); step L next to R (ct &); step R swd (ct 2); step L next to R (ct &);
2Step R swd (ct 1); step L next to R (ct &); step R swd (ct 2); low hop R, extending L over in front of R (ct &);
 
3M: Step L to R of R ft (ct 1); low hop L, clicking heels together (ct &); step R next to L (ct 2); low hop R, clicking heels together (ct &);
4-7Step L next to R (ct 1); low hop L, clicking heels together (ct &); and so forth for a total of ten step-hops;
 
3-7W: Dance same steps as M except that they do not click heels and low hops are not as strong as M;
 
8Stamp L,R,L in place, taking wt on each stamp (cts 1,&,2).
 
 Repeat entire dance from beg.
 

 
ROKOKO KOLO
Serbia and Croatia
 

The song "Oj, divojko rokoko" (oy DEE-voy-koh roh-koh-KOH) or "Hey, fancy girl" is an old favorite of the so-called bećar repertory of Slavonia (eastern Croatia) and the Vojvodina region of Yugoslavia. The term bećar was applied to the "swinging" young bachelors of the village who spent much time in the local tavern, drinking, playing the tanburica, and singing merry, uninhibited songs about women, rakija, and the glories of the active single life.

As was the case with many bećar songs, the words for "Oj, divojko rokoko" were often improvised on the spot, although there were a few standard verses that were sung toward the beginning to get the creative process warmed up. The melody of this song led an independent life as a dance tune, retaining the word Rokoko as its title, and often the musicians would sing a verse or two as the people danced. The dance itself had several variants.

The melody of this song led and independent life as a dance tune, retaining the word Rokoko as its title, and often the musicians would sing a verse or two as the people danced.

 
Oj, divojko rokoko,
Ne ljubi te makar ko?
Ne ljubi te makar ko,
Oj, divojko rokoko?

Oj, divojko rokoko,
Ne ljubi te makar ko?
Mene ljubi momak mlad,
Crna oka, golobrad.

Oj, divojko rokoko,
Ljubi l' tebe još i ko?
Mene ljubi oficir,
Provog reda granatir.

Oj, divojko rokoko,
Poljubi me u oko,
Ja ću tebe u čelo,
Pa će biti veselo.

Turčin šerbet da pije,
Srbin piue rakije,
A švabica gracerbir,
Pa ti kaže: "Gib mir hir!"

Hey, fancy girl,
Does anybody love you?
Does anybody love you,
Hey, fancy girl?

Hey, fancy girl,
Does anybody love you?
A young fellow loves me,
He has dark eyes and no beard.

Hey, fancy girl,
Does anybody else love you?
An officer loves me,
He's a first-class grenadier.

Hey, fancy girl,
Kiss me on the eye,
I'll kiss you on the forehead,
And we'll have a good time.

The Turk drinks sherbet,
The Serb drinks rakija [brandy],
The German girl drinks beer from Graz [Austria],
And tells you, "Give me that! [here!]"


Copyright © 2012 by Dick Oakes