OPSA

Unites States Serbian/Croatian

PRONUNCIATION: OHP-sah
 
TRANSLATION: Opsa! is a spontaneous exclamation often used while dancing. There is no exact English translation, but it is something like "whee," "yippee," or "ee-haw!"
 
SOURCE: Dick Oakes learned this dance from a video of Steve Kotansky dancing Opsa.
 
BACKGROUND: In July of 1994, Dick Crum said of the dance, "Opsa is currently one of the most popular dances at Croatian and Serbian dance events in the major cities of the Upper Midwest and the Pennsylvania/Ohio area. Its melody is relatively recent, having been composed and recorded in former Yugoslavia about a decade ago. The origins of the dance per se are obscure – it seems to have arisen here in the United States, possibly around Pittsburgh. On the other hand, its structure has the same 5-measure pattern as the old Serbian Vranjanka. I first saw and learned it at the Tamburitza Extravaganza weekend in Los Angeles, 1993, where tamburitza players and fans of tamburitza music from all over the United States had gathered, and Opsa was played and danced dozens of times."

MUSIC: Jugoton Stereo CAY-814 (Nenad Jovanović), Side 2
 
FORMATION: Face very slightly R of center in an open cir, M and W, hands joined and held in a W pos to start.
 
METER/RHYTHM: 2/4
 
STEPS/STYLE: Somewhat small steps, but with enthusiasm.
 


MEAS MOVEMENT DESCRIPTION


 
  INTRODUCTION
 
  None.
 
  THE DANCE
1 Step R to R in LOD (ct 1); step L in LOD (ct 2);
 
2 Step R in LOD, turning to face ctr (ct 1); close L next to R without wt (ct 2);
 
3 Step slightly swd L (ct 1); close R next to L without wt (ct 2);
 
4 Step slightly swd R (ct 1); close L next to R without wt (ct 2);
 
5 Step slightly L turning to face slightly R (ct 1); bringing hands dn and slightly bkwd, step bkwd on R (ct 2); step L across R, beg to move on LOD and bringing hands up to W pos (ct &).
 
  Repeat entire dance from beg.


OPSA
Unites States Serbian/Croatian

/ Nek' se igra ovo kolo, ko ga ne bi vol'o? /
/ Kolo ide Tako lako, da zaigra moše svako. /
 
        Chorus:
        Devojke se ćuju, opsa, skoči!
        Nedaju se momci, oće brže,
        Složije i bolje igraj do zore opsa!
 
/ Nek' se igra ovo kolo, ko ga ne bi vol'o? /
/ Momci, cure, svi u kolo, nek' se vije naokolo, /
 
Chorus:
 
/ Nek' se igra ovo kolo, ko ga ne bi vol'o? /
/ Zurle ješe, bubanj bije, vesele se meraklije. /
 
Chorus:

 
  Let's dance this kolo, everyone loves it.
It moves so freely and easily, everyone can dance it.
 
        Chorus:
        You can hear the girls shouting: "Opsa! Dance!"
        The boys won't be outdone, hey want to dance faster,
        more together and better – dance till dawn, opsa!
 
Let's dance this kolo – everyone loves it.
Boys, girls, everybody join in the kolo, wind it around.
 
Chorus:

Let's dance this kolo – everyone loves it.
The zurlas are wailing, the drum is beating, and the dancers are on a high.
 
Chorus:

NOTE: Zurla (ZOOR-lah) is a shawm-like folk instrument common in southern Serbia, Macedonia, and other southern Balkan countries. It is usually played in pairs with accompaniment by a drum (bubanj, tâpan, etc.).


Copyright © 2014 by Dick Oakes